Tag Archives: F1

How About that F1 & Indy 500 Doubleheader?

2017 Monaco Grand Prix

Zak Mauger/LAT Images

Memorial Day weekend was one heck of a motorsports extravaganza for open wheel racing fans. There was the Monaco Grand Prix and the Indy 500.

First, the Indy 500 was far and away the more exciting race. I rarely even pay attention to it but the fact that Fernando Alonso decided to give it a shot was huge news and generated a ton of additional interest for what is already a tremendous event.

The race itself had everyone on the edge of their seats. The Scott Dixon/Jay Howard crash, and Helio Castro-Neves barely avoiding getting caught up in it and driving through the grass at speed underneath Dixon’s somersaulting car resembled a Hollywood stunt scene more than a real race. I could have done without the crashes but I’m glad no one was seriously hurt.

Too bad Alonso’s Honda engine let go with only a few laps to go. He was in it with a chance to win and certainly acquitted himself well regardless. Honda, not so much.

Then Castro-Neves, a three-time Indy 500 winner, managed to get his car to the front with only a few laps to go. Mind you he had lost part of his rear wing dodging the Dixon/Howard crash. The racing back and forth with Takuma Sato and Ed Jones had me on the edge of my seat.

After Alonso was out I was hoping former F1 driver Sato could bring it home first, though – based on his erratic F1 record – I was nervous he’d manage to crash within sight of the checkered flag. I can’t remember the last time a race finish was this close in F1. This year’s Indy 500 was a fantastic event with lots of excitement, despite the fact I find the cars so ungainly.

The Big Picture

If I were to bet money I’d say that next year Alonso will be remain in F1 but he won’t be driving a Honda-powered car. His competitive situation is just dreadful and there are no signs of life Honda will get it for 2018.

On the other hand, maybe Zak Brown and McLaren are looking to expand the McLaren empire to other series and to keeping Alonso by dangling the prospect of winning the triple crown he wants by getting him rides at the Indy 500 in the future, and maybe even the top class at the 24 Hours of Le Mans if McLaren builds such a car?

Even more intriguing, are the owners of the Indy 500 looking to sell to Liberty Media and how much of an influence were they in bringing Alonso on board to show how much additional interest F1 participation could produce (and therefore bump up the value of the event)?

Liberty has been clear about looking to expand the calendar with more events in the U.S. Not only that but Jean Todt has been quoted as saying the FIA are looking at coordinating the schedules of F1, the 24 Hours of Le Mans, and Formula E to avoid conflicts.

Might the F1 calendar be able to make it so the Indy 500 becomes an event that more F1 drivers could participate in? And what if Liberty bought IndyCar? It’s possible they could then bring F1 to venues like Long Beach, California and St. Petersburg, Florida.

I’m pretty sure there was far more to Alonso at Indy than just him wanting to race there.

On To Monaco

The Monaco GP was pretty dull, with the most exciting on-track action happening when Pascal Wehrlein and Jenson Button (“I’ll pee in your seat!”), in a one-off appearance subbing for Alonso, collided. Poor Wehrlein ended up with his car on its side against the barrier. Again, glad no one was hurt.

The other exciting moments were the times Sergio Perez drove like a bull in a china shop in between telling off his team over the radio. Team player he wasn’t, and ultimately it was for naught as he scored exactly zero points.

With the Mercedes team struggling for pace and Lewis Hamilton uncharacteristically down and out in qualifying, the race was all about the Ferraris. They qualified 1-2 with Kimi Raikkonen on pole, and finished 1-2 with teammate Sebastian Vettel winning.

One has to wonder if the team quietly switched the order of the two drivers during the pitstops to give championship leader Vettel every advantage in the battle with Hamilton. Much has been said about how unhappy Raikkonen was with the result.

While I’m not sure it does seem odd that Ferrari would pit and release Raikkonen right into lapped traffic. There is no doubt though that Vettel had immense pace so if it was a strategic call to switch the drivers, Ferrari definitely made a good choice.

It’s just that it would have been so much more interesting to see the teammates battle it out, and a Raikkonen victory would have surely been immensely popular.

Other than that it was a snoozefest. Even the ever aggressive Max Verstappen, who had his own radio meltdown, couldn’t find any way to complete an on-track pass.

2017 F1 Season Preview

2017 Australian Grand Prix, Friday - Wolfgang Wilhelm

2017 Australian Grand Prix, Friday – Wolfgang Wilhelm

Well, that didn’t seem to take long. Last season ended and this season is starting, and I haven’t posted anything in between. Not that I haven’t been writing, I just tend to forget to post things… some times for extended periods of time.

Anyway, Nico Rosberg took the F1 title on the last lap of the last race in Abu Dhabi last year. It was a real nailbiter. Then he promptly retired, surprising pretty much everyone including his own team. Continue reading “2017 F1 Season Preview” »

Abu Dhabi Do – The 2016 F1 Season Finale

Red Bull F1

Photo courtesy Red Bull

Here we are at the final round of another Formula One season where the title will be decided at the very end. After 20 rounds Nico Rosberg leads his Mercedes teammate Lewis Hamilton by 12 points setting up almost a story book situation.

While both drivers are fast, proven winners they are a study in contrasts. Hamilton has three World Championships under his belt, and is currently second on the all time wins/poles (52/61, respectively) lists. Rosberg is racing for his first, with a total of 23 wins and 30 poles. Of the two, Hamilton clearly is a more instinctual driver and has the edge in terms of raw speed and racecraft. He’s a natural.

Rosberg is more analytical and measured, a very intelligent team player. He’s put in a lot of work over the years and, if it weren’t Hamilton in the other car, he may well have already had a World Championship to his name.
Continue reading “Abu Dhabi Do – The 2016 F1 Season Finale” »

F1 2016: Nevermind the Drawing Board

Pastor Maldonado crashes again

Who knew Pastor Maldonado crashed the Australian Grand Prix (again)? At least according to GrandPrix.com he did.

This was the first Formula One race of 2016. I’ll get to the race a little later. There’s no point in sugarcoating what I think of the new qualifying format: It was terrible.

Instead of the previous format of having three “knockout” sessions where a set number of the slowest drivers are eliminated after each of the first two sessions, F1 has kept the three session knockout format but made a confusing change where after a certain number of minutes into each session, the slowest driver gets knocked out every 90 seconds. This gets repeated until the requisite number of drivers is eliminated. The idea behind this was that somehow it would improve the show and mix up the field. It did neither.

F1 should immediately scrap the format and revert to the previous one. Don’t go back to the drawing board, don’t try to make more changes. Just drop it and we’ll all pretend it never happened. Of all the problems that F1 had leading up to this year, qualifying was not one of them. But now it is. Continue reading “F1 2016: Nevermind the Drawing Board” »

2014 F1 Season Review

Red Bull Formula 1 in Singapore GP

Red Bulls in Singapore F1 race

Okay so I’m a bit behind on this recap but I did watch the race the same day it took place. Not that that makes this post any more current.

Mercedes duly clinched the Constructors’ Championship in Russia, the 16th of 19 races – their first ever as a constructor – but not without a season full of drama. It was inevitable because they let their two drivers race each other and stuck by that policy, even when it seemed to go pear shaped after they collided on track at the start of the Belgian grand prix at Spa. So kudos to them for doing so.

Lewis Hamilton won the race and his second World Championship while teammate Nico Rosberg finished 14th in the race and second in the championship in what could only be described as a letdown in the final race at Abu Dhabi due to Rosberg’s KERS system failing.

However, that doesn’t take away from Hamilton’s 11 victories out of 19 races. He finally earned his second title, though he almost certainly would have won more titles by now had he been less of a celebrity prima donna earlier in his career.

Since his 2007 F1 debut he has become more focused and mature. But he some times still displays appallingly petulant behavior as during the Monaco race weekend when he refused to acknowledge his teammate on the podium after Rosberg’s victory. (Hamilton had accused Rosberg of cheating in qualifying by backing up the escape road during his best lap, causing the session to be red flagged and nullifying Hamilton’s best lap time.)

Continue reading “2014 F1 Season Review” »

Anatomy of Great Races

BMW Z4 race car at Virginia International Raceway (VIR)

BMW Z4 racing in the 2014 TUDOR United SportsCar Championship

Many elements play a part in the making of a classic race. Since the beginning of auto racing, the great races tend to contain a number of common traits. First and foremost, racing is a battle of drivers. The cars, teams, series and tracks are there to provide the platform upon which drivers compete.

High tech for its own sake isn’t of much entertainment value. Racing is a human contest, not a science fair. So let’s not get all geeked out on technical minutia and rules that may or may not improve performance, probably won’t appreciably improve the show, will likely stir up controversies and penalties and definitely drive up costs.

A race can be viewed as the sum of three distinct phases. Similar to chess it can be viewed as having opening, middle and end stages – mixed in with a high rate of speed.

Most races have exciting opening phases. That’s often the best part of an event because all the cars are close together and anything can happen, good…

Continue reading “Anatomy of Great Races” »

2014 F1 Mid-Season Review

Sebastian Vettel leads Fernando Alonso at the 2014 German Grand Prix

Red Bull leads Ferrari at the German Grand Prix. Photo courtesy of Red Bull.

It’s been about four months since the 2014 Formula One (F1) season began. We are just past the half way point with 10 of the 19 races in the books. So far the action has been pretty good, especially toward the mid-field and fears of F1 dullness have proven to be unfounded. However, the cars are more expensive, complicated and uglier than ever and the racing hasn’t improved – not that there hasn’t been good racing, it just hasn’t improved.

On-Track Action

Mercedes has won all but one race. Nico Rosberg, with four wins and one non-finish (DNF), leads the championship by 14 points over teammate Lewis Hamilton, who has five wins and two DNFs. At least the team has so far let the two drivers battle it out. Daniel Ricciardo, who managed to win one race for the formerly dominant Red Bull team, lies third in the points.

At this time last year there were five different winners from four different teams. Granted after that Sebastian Vettel won all nine of the races in the second half of the season, but what this year has shown is that these new regulations and technologies haven’t made a hill of beans difference in the quality of the action that a far less expensive rules package couldn’t have made.

Further, a lot of the action has been wrought through the continued use of the Drag Reduction System (DRS), which artificially gives a following car much more straightline speed since the leading car can’t use its system in that situation, and the appearance of the safety car at several races (most notably Bahrain), which also bunched up the field.

Other than Williams-Mercedes driver Felipe Massa securing pole position in Austria, the Mercedes team has claimed pole at the nine other races – five by Rosberg and four by Hamilton.
Continue reading “2014 F1 Mid-Season Review” »

Formula One Takes A Wrong Turn In 2014

2014 Ferrari F14/T

2014 Ferrari F1 car – Photo courtesy Ferrari North America

The FIA, governing body of Formula One (F1), banned active suspension and anti-lock brakes (ABS) for the 1994 season, ostensibly to curb costs and put racing first by emphasizing the driver’s role. Adherence to emphasis on driver skill has served the sport well in its rise to worldwide prominence.

Twenty years on, the start of the 2014 season saw the introduction of a host of new technologies aimed at increasing road car relevance and spicing up the show. It’s made a mess of the sport.
Continue reading “Formula One Takes A Wrong Turn In 2014” »

The Storied Tale of the 1991-2005 Acura NSX

Acura NSX aluminum sports car

Acura NSX

The Acura NSX, Honda’s legendary flagship sports car, was the first production Japanese exotic car. It was introduced to the U.S. market (known as the Honda NSX elsewhere) for the 1991 model year, right on the back of the company’s streak of supplying engines to six straight (1986-1991) Formula One Constructors Championships.

What set the NSX apart was its singular focus on delivering an unparalleled driving experience, breaking new ground in handling performance without the traditional quirks and shortcomings of the exotic car genre.
Continue reading “The Storied Tale of the 1991-2005 Acura NSX” »